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The 10th Marines is one of the oldest and proudest of the regiments of Marines.

 It's unbroken service spans 86 years. The line from the Marines Hymn, "We have fought in every clime and place where we could take a gun," could well serve as its motto: Mexico, Haiti, Santo Domingo, the Pacific islands and atolls- the regiment has been there. In times of peace and near war, it has served in Iceland, China, Japan, Lebanon, Norway and Germany, and with the Landing Force Sixth Fleet.

The 10th Marines were formed on April 25th 1914 as an Artillery Battalion under the 1st Marine Brigade. The 10th Marines took part in conflicts in Haiti and the Dominican Republic from August 1915 to May 1917. The Battalion was expanded throughout mid 1917 and finally, on 15 January 1917 the expanded Battalion was redesignated as the 10th Marine Regiment of Field Artillery.

Between the First and Second World War the 10th Regiment worked on many different things, including annual reenactments of Civil War battles, building their Barracks and various other construction around the base, and guarding the mail. Also during this time the Regiment was deployed to China, and also to Iceland just prior to American involvement in World War II. During the war the Regiment was involved in the assault on Guadalcanal and later took part in the bloody taking of Tarawa and later Saipan, Tinian and Okinawa.

After the end of World War II the 10th Marines found themselves at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, which would be their home until present day. They once again found themselves mobilized during the Korean war and again later during the Cuban Missile Crisis when they participated in the blockade of Cuba. As the Korean war started the 10th Marines were working with a skeleton crew, but five month's later they were back up to full wartime strength and ready to fight.

Since that time the Regiment has participated in exercises testing the methods of firing 155mm Howitzers from Landing Craft, as well as the twice annual Fire Exercise at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The Regiment has also continuously sent Firing Batteries and Battalions to train in Okinawa and to participate in CAX, a desert training operation held at Twenty Nine Palms California at the edge of the Mohave Desert.

The Regiment has time and again shown that it can set up, fire and move to a new position with astounding speed, and twice a year they display their skill in the direct fire competition at Fort Bragg.

  • What are the applicable statutes/regulations?   
    The right of all Marine Corps members to directly communicate grievances to, or seek assistance from, their Commanding Officer(s) is established in U.S. Navy Regulations (Articles 0820c and 1151.1) and the Marine Corps Manual (par 805).  This right is exercised through the formal process of Request Mast. 

    What is Request Mast?   
    Request Mast includes both the right of the member to personally talk to the Commanding Officer, normally in person, and the requirement that the Commanding Officer consider the matter and personally respond to the member requesting mast. 

    Request Mast provides a member the opportunity to communicate not only with his or her immediate Commanding Officer, but also with any superior Commanding Officer in the chain of command up to and including the member's immediate Commanding General.  Request Mast also provides Commanding Officers with firsthand knowledge of the morale and general welfare of the command. 

    Who can request mast?  
    All Marine Corps members should first make every effort to address offending behavior directly with the party responsible, verbally or in writing.  You can also discuss the matter with your immediate supervisor and request assistance.  If you are unable to resolve the issue informally, you have the right to Request Mast. 

    Can a Commanding Officer deny a Request Mast application?   
    A Commanding Officer may deny a Request Mast application if there is another specific avenue of redress available to the member.  The Commanding Officer should explain to the member why he/she denied the Request Mast application and, if appropriate, explain the procedure the member should follow to resolve the issue. 

    The Commanding Officer may also require the member to go through the Chain of Command prior to approving Mast.

    What are some issues that are not appropriate for Request Mast?  
    Generally, a military member can speak to their Commanding Officer about any subject; however, the member cannot use Request Mast for the following reasons:

    • Request Mast should not be used as a means of attacking the proceedings, punishment, or findings and sentence resulting from a disciplinary action brought under the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ). 
    • Request Mast may not be used to harass, avoid duty, or intentionally interfere with the Commanding Officer's ability to carry out the functions and mission of the command.
    • Request Mast cannot be used if the member is being processed for involuntary separation or if the subject of the complaint is an ongoing Article 138, UCMJ, or Article 1150, Navy Regulations.

    How do I submit a Request Mast application? 
    Complete the application form (NAVMC 11296) and submit it through the chain of command to the Commanding Officer.  Ask your legal office for assistance in obtaining a copy of the form.

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